NYC: KUNJIP RESTAURANT

Oct 4 • ASIAN, KOREAN, NYC, REVIEW • 206 Views • Comments Off on NYC: KUNJIP RESTAURANT

If you know me at all, you’ll know that I have a semi-unhealthy relationship with beef short ribs. Korean-style beef short ribs. Cooked over a barbecue, preferably.

I’m obsessed with them. I’m constantly at the local Asian supermarket picking up pounds and pounds of these meaty treats. I check out which butchers sell short ribs, and have made plans to head to D’Arcy’s Meat Market the next time I’m craving Korean BBQ. Note: they have an excellent homemade recipe for Korean galbi (short ribs in a Korean soy sauce) on their website’s blog!

I’ll put up my never-fail recipe for Korean short ribs soon but, until then, I’ll leave you to drool over the pictures from Kunjip Restaurant in New York City.

Despite my obsession with short ribs, I’ve never actually been to a Korean BBQ restaurant. Rachel and I had heard great things about Kunjip and decided to check it out with all the apprehension and excitement of first-timers.

The restaurant doesn’t take reservations, so potential diners have to wait in a long line that snakes through the restaurant and protrudes out onto the street and halfway down the block. It gets busy, but the line moves fast. If those Kunjip servers are anything, they’re efficient.

Perhaps a little too efficient. When we were seated (after about a 20 minute wait), they immediately started bringing out our order, which they’d taken while we waited in line. We ordered drinks–a cold sake for Rachel, a hot sake for me–and I had to very firmly request my hot sake despite the woman’s insistence that “cold sake is better.” Yes, it was a Saturday night, and yes, they had a long line-up, but the server made it very clear that making a hot sake to order was very much an inconvenience. I pressed my point and eventually received my drink from the mildly irritated middle-aged female server.

Our food was all delivered within a couple of minutes: seafood pancake (Hae Mool Pa Jun), rice with vegetables and egg (Sanche Bibimbob), and our short rib BBQ assortment (Gal Bi Gui). As first-timers, we didn’t actually realize how much food we’d ordered, and that the Gal Bi Gui came not only with short ribs, but with lettuce, ssamjang sauce, kimchi, purple rice, green beans, tofu, egg soup, and more.

We also didn’t realize that the trick to Korean BBQ is to create a lettuce wrap using the short ribs, ssamjang sauce, and any other fixings we desire. Luckily, the same woman who graced me with hot sake took pity on us, taking it upon herself to prepare us each a beef wrap before unceremoniously plunking them directly into our mouths (I’m not even joking…she fed us). It was hilarious, it was delicious, and it was actually very kind of her.

After that, we got on like a house on fire. There was clearly too much food, but we made the best of it, and the servers no longer rushed us (although they did eye us quite regularly towards the end of the meal).

One thing that did disappoint me, though, is that we’d requested the short ribs to be barbecued at the table. They urged us to let them cook it in the back–probably because our table was too small and they didn’t want to waste time barbecuing for two people–so the short ribs came out cooked. I’d have liked to see them cooked at the table; if that’s something that you’d go for, I’d recommend going with a small group. The groups that I saw there received more attention from the servers.

A word of advice to those who hate being rushed whilst eating (as do I) – just don’t let them. They’re not going to force you out of your seat. Eat your food, enjoy your company, and leave when you’re ready. Don’t bogart the table for no reason, but don’t feel compelled to bolt down your food and run out the door.

Despite the sense of urgency you get from the servers in their quest to flip tables, and despite the one lady’s reluctance to serve hot sake, I really enjoyed Kunjip. The food was excellent and the service was blindingly fast. And oh, those short ribs…they were worth the wait, and worth the rushing.

I look forward to trying Korean BBQ restaurants in Edmonton so that I’m able to compare between the two. If you’re in New York City, though, check this place out: it’s completely no-fuss, and you have to expect that you’ll receive authentic service for an Asian restaurant (i.e. often blunt), but the food is worth it and reasonably priced…provided you don’t over order.

Kunjip
9 W 32nd St
New York, NY 10001
(212) 216-9478
Open 24 hours

 3.5/5

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