Discover Phuket’s culinary paradise

The Pearl Island of Phuket is not only known for its clear beaches, fine white sand beaches and vibrant activities but also known by tourists for its unique cuisine. In fact, Phuket culinary paradise is worth exploring, follow this article to see if there are any of Phuket’s foods that we recommend!

Thai cuisine is divided into 4 regions, each of which will be influenced by different cuisines of the country and has different ways of cooking and seasoning, thus making Thai cuisine should be unique and attractive to visitors.

Northeastern Thai cuisine influenced by Laos, sticky rice is the main dish and often combined with meat, pork blood, papaya mannequin, grilled fish, grilled chicken …

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Central Thai cuisine is a combination of regions of this country. Foods in the Central region influenced by royal cooking should be elaborate and sophisticated, and they prefer to eat soft, smooth and slightly sweet dishes. The presentation of the food is also very artistic and beautiful.

Traveling to Phuket without enjoying street food is really wasteful. Because the stalls selling food along the street in Phuket are not only attractive by taste, color but also very affordable prices.

Suggest a few dishes you should try on the go or food markets such as dim sum, roti, grilled skewers and lots of sweet dishes like coconut cake, Thai pancakes, coconut cream sponge cake, coconut milk custard and pumpkin.

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You just have to fill the stomach but do not worry where the money will fall because the price of these snacks is not too expensive, it only falls about 50 baht. If you’ve enjoyed street food, you should also go to restaurants for other experiences of Phuket cuisine.

Kan Eang Seafood is one of Phuket’s most famous seafood restaurants. Fresh seafood is what attracts many people. You can directly select the fish, squid, shellfish … alive from the water tank. After that, the chef will catch and process as required by you.

Cuisine is an intangible cultural heritage of humanity

Although the number is not much in UNESCO‘s recognized heritage list, cuisine is an attractive and potential heritage, being paid attention by many countries in search of a worthy place for literary value to this delicate culture.

Referring to French cuisine, not only mention a pinnacle of European culinary elite has been recognized as the intangible Cultural Heritage of mankind in 2010. This is also the home of famous chefs. , is the birthplace of premium food as well as shaping a sophisticated dining style has become the norm of world cuisine.

For centuries, the French have always believed that there is nothing to delight their taste and sublimation by eating a delicious meal with family and friends. At an agricultural fair in 2008, President Nicolas Sarkozy proudly declared “the best French cuisine in the world and needs to be included in the list of UNESCO’s human cultural heritage”.

When traditional Japanese cuisine – Washoku is recognized by UNESCO in 2013, Japanese people are extremely proud because this is not a specific dish but a food that has been honored by the world.

The idea of ​​proposing UNESCO to recognize traditional Japanese food is the world intangible cultural heritage initiated by the top chefs in the ancient capital of Kyoto to protect the traditional culinary value before “attacking “Strong of fast food. The Japanese were really ambitious when proposing UNESCO to recognize not only a specific dish but instead a sum of traditional dishes.

In addition, Japanese chefs are always interested in aesthetics, so that every dish looks like a work of art. Japanese people often prefer frugal foods so limit the use of garlic, pepper and grease. Chefs are always picky in choosing food plates, in which the favorite material is antique and lacquer with many different colors and shapes.

Do you understand why sports athletes have to eat bananas

Hey, somewhere you have caught sight of athletes, people who exercise, eat bananas after they are tired. So do you think while there are many different options for sports drinks, why do they eat bananas to supplement their energy And a recent study by the Appalachian State University (USA) has provided evidence that bananas may be a better choice than sports drinks after exercising.

The researchers analyzed blood samples from 20 cyclist after using sports drinks and bananas. As a result, in addition to the amount of carbohydrates that help restore energy, bananas appear to be superior in their ability to provide anti-inflammatory substances compared to most sports drinks on the market.

Like pain relievers, anti-inflammatory substances are important for reducing pain, swelling of muscles and cramps during exercise. Dr. David Nieman from the Appalachian University said: “Using bananas and filtered water during exercise is more beneficial than conventional sports drinks, which include anti-inflammatory, better nutrition. and enhance metabolism.”

Researchers also recommend that, because the anti-inflammatory content of bananas is safer, does not adversely affect cells. They explained: “Although sports drinks are good for athletes, bananas have other nutrients – vitamin C and vitamin B6, fiber and unique metabolites – other drinks have.”

Alternatively, you can use blueberries to replace bananas. Researchers point out that the nutritional content of blueberries is like bananas. Dr. Nieman also said, in the future, when exercising, the nutrients in fruits – Phytochemicals – will completely replace chemical foods. In short, eat bananas when you go to the gym.

When people are active in prolonged physical activity, energy is greatly depleted, the body must mobilize blood sugar to supply muscles. In these cases, bananas in the banana that are absorbed quickly into the blood can immediately replenish the loss of sugar, helping the athlete recover after fatigue.

In bananas with slow absorption of fructose, maintain energy for the body longer. In addition, bananas contain other slowly metabolized carbohydrates and release blood sugar slowly in response to hours of physical activity. High potassium levels in bananas also help maintain muscle tone, reducing the risk of athletes cramps.

BLISS BAKED GOODS

As a British expat living in Canada, there are a number of things I miss about my birth country that I just can’t seem to find even in the busiest cities of the Great White North.

Certain foods, for example, remind me of my childhood. A smell or a taste can bring me back to my life in our quiet British village—a life that saw me regularly making the trek to the local newsagents to pick up the latest Beano comic. I’d grab a Sherbet Fountain (a tube of sherbet that came with a black liquorice dipping stick) along with my comic before heading around the corner to the bakery, where I’d buy my favourite cheese straws (cheesy puff pastries).

Flavours and textures bring back memories—sometimes I can seek them out, such as finding Lyle’s Golden Syrup at Save on Foods. Others come upon me when I least expect it, such as a taste of pizza in New York reminding me instantaneously of Cottingham’s sole pizza takeaway joint. Food has an uncanny ability to prompt involuntary memories, creating an instance of time travel with a mere taste.

The same feeling came over me the second I bit into a cinnamon and sugar doughnut from Bliss Baked Goods, a family-owned bakery located in Edmonton’s Glenora district.

Found next to Gini’s Restaurant, Bliss is a modest bakery that uses their space solely to make and display their products—there’s nothing superfluous in the setting. The bakery is owned by husband-and-wife team Lawrence and Shaindel Bliss, who have been running Bliss Baked Goods since they started the business on 118th Avenue more than 11 years ago. They moved into the new Glenora location in September 2014.

Lawrence Bliss

The bakery specializes in 100% kosher, dairy-free and nut-free baked goods, with a number of vegan options, including pastries and some specially made doughnuts.

We visited on a Friday morning to pick up a dozen doughnuts for the office and ended up chatting with Lawrence and Shaindel, who explained their bakery’s philosophy and specialities. They gave us a taste of the cinnamon and sugar doughnut, which immediately brought me back to my favourite bakery in England—the soft, fluffy texture of the doughnut mixed with the gritty sweetness of the perfect blend of cinnamon and sugar. I haven’t had a doughnut like that in years.

They insisted I take with me a vegan maple doughnut, which I devoured as soon as I returned to the office. I’ve never had a vegan doughnut before and, to my surprise, it wasn’t much different from a regular doughnut. It was delicious, creamy, soft—everything you’d assume a vegan doughnut could never be. (Then again, if they can make vegan bacon…)

After tasting the delicious treats at Bliss Baked Goods, I’m not surprised to learn that they were recognized in Avenue Magazine’s 25 Best Things to Eat (2013) for their cinnamon and sugar doughnuts. If they can bring back my memories of childhood innocence, sweet cravings, and English cobblestones, then how will these sugary treats work their magic on you?

Bliss Baked Goods
10710 142 Street
Edmonton, AB T5N 2P7
(780) 453-0101

4.5/5

Cookie Pairing at Baseline Wine

Wine and cheese: standard. Wine and steak: played out. Wine and cookies: wait…what?

It might sound like an unnatural pairing, but Baseline Wine recently bit the bullet and put the two treats together in a Cookie Pairing event. In partnership with Kathy Leskow from Confetti Sweets, the two Sherwood Park businesses combined their wares to offer a selection of delectable cookies paired with wines and liquors chosen to enhance flavours, bring out subtleties, and shock those who thought it couldn’t be done.

However, if you’re an avid wine drinker or someone who likes the challenge of a pairing, you’d know that anything is possible. Ryan Tycholas, manager of Baseline Wine, was our gracious host during the Cookie Pairing event on November 14th, which focused on a variety of six alcoholic drinks selected to pair with six of Kathy’s cookies.

We started the evening with a glass of prosecco to cleanse our palates then dove right into a Hochheimer Königin Victoriaberg Riesling and coconut cookie pairing. These two tastes, when put together, brought out another depth of flavour in both the cookie and the wine. As we would learn throughout the night, a perfectly paired couple has so much more to offer as a pair than as individual tastes. In any case, I loved this pairing and bought myself a bottle of the riesling after the event–which is fairly significant, since I don’t usually drink white wine.


We moved onto the next pairing: Smashberry White with Kathy’s sugar cookie. I’m not usually a fan of sugar cookies and I wasn’t a huge fan of the Smashberry on its own, but I well and truly liked these two together. The sweetness of the cookie amped up the sweetness of the wine, making them a great mix. The vanilla flavouring of the sugar cookie was an excellent counter to the acidity of the wine.

Course three included a glass of Earthquake Zinfandel and a delectable chocolate chunk cookie with Skor pieces. This was one of my favourite pairings of the evening–rich, heady flavours with a beautiful hint of caramel decorated each bite and sip. Delicious.
Next up was Molly Dooker’s The Boxer wine with Kathy’s peanut butter cookie–a good pairing, as all the others had been throughout the evening. I’m not much of a peanut butter cookie person, though, and shiraz is always touch-and-go for me, so this was probably the least memorable pairing for me. (Which isn’t to say that I still didn’t enjoy it!)

My ultimate favourite came near the end with the Taylor Fladgate Port and breakfast cookie pairing. The breakfast cookie had a nutty flavour that went brilliantly with the heavy sweetness of the port. Together, they were a beautiful pairing with hints of cinnamon throughout.

Finally, we paired a glass of RumChata with a ginger snap cookie and enjoyed the combination of milky sweetness with the gingery bite of the cookie. I thoroughly enjoyed this pairing and thought it was a brilliant end to a great tasting event–akin to a glass of milk and cookie before bed time.

And with that, we were all stuffed to the brim with excellent sweets and drink. Ryan and Kathy provided a unique experience that takes a daring spin on the traditional wine pairing event. That risk paid off with a number of perfect pairings and a room full of convinced tasters. I’m looking forward to seeing what Baseline Wine and Confetti Sweets will come up with next!

Baseline Wine
11 Athabascan Avenue, Unit 172
Sherwood Park, AB T8A 6H2
(780) 449-4448

Confetti Sweets
41 Broadway Blvd
Sherwood Park, AB T8H 2C1
(780) 570-5080

CHEFS, UNCENSORED: THE DUCHESS BAKE SHOP TEAM

Ever wondered who’s behind the delicious dishes? Here’s your chance to get to know the masters of grilling, the best of the bakers, and the kings and queens of Edmonton’s food scene.

Welcome to Chefs, Uncensored.

Duchess Bake Shop has been around since 2009 and is one of 124 Street’s staple foodie havens. All items are made daily in-house…from scratch. There are over 20 pastry chefs in the Duchess kitchen, so this interview was put together as a collaboration from the whole team, with pastry chef Kerri Stennes as a representative.

How would you describe your baking style?

The baking style at Duchess is mainly French inspired, but we also include some popular Canadian favorites.

What’s your food/shop philosophy?

Our philosophy is that there are no shortcuts to making good quality product. For us, that means using the best quality ingredients we can find, and making everything by hand in small batches, in house, every day. Those basic techniques allow us to maintain the freshest and best products.

What inspired you to become a chef?

Being able to bake a pie from scratch, give it to a friend or neighbour and then seeing the joy that it brought is what made me realize my dream was to become a pastry chef. Working at Duchess has brought that dream to a new level because everyone on our team is so passionate about creating memorable experiences through pastry. I have learned that baking is a great art; it requires careful attention to detail and a steady hand!

What’s the first thing you ate that made you realize food was an important part of culture?

A blueberry muffin in my grandmother’s kitchen. From a young age I knew that food had the power to bring people together. My mother was always encouraging us to help out with dinner or baking, and I have fond memories of sharing that time with her. It was great watching the family enjoying our food over multiple conversations.

What’s your favourite wine and what do you like to pair it with?

My favorite wine is a rich, Spanish Rioja paired with a goat cheese blanc mange and muddled blackberries.

What do you think is Edmonton’s next big innovative ingredient?

I don’t think it is one particular ingredient. Edmonton is realizing the potential of using high quality, local ingredients. Any ingredient can be innovative when you experience how unique its flavour is and feel inspired to create a dessert around it.

Why should people visit your bake shop?

We’re trying to create an elegant, cosmopolitan environment full of amazing people and world class food – it’s a unique experience.

Duchess Bake Shop
10718 124 Street
Edmonton, AB T5M 0H1
(780) 488-4999