The sophistication of French cuisine

Referring to France, in addition to the magnificent Paris, in addition to the poetic and peaceful Seine, people also mention exquisite and extremely interesting cuisine. We, who are learning French, learn about these poetic traits.

With its vast expansive vineyards, France is one of the European countries with the longest history of wine production. Wine in France is not only a party drink, but also a special ingredient that contributes to the success of the dishes.

Bordeaux is a city located on the banks of the Garonne River, the world leader in the amount of wine produced and is considered the wine capital of the world. It is these factors that make the striking difference of French wine.

Kết quả hình ảnh cho Rượu nho pháp

France is considered to be the largest cheese consuming country in the world, and perhaps nowhere else has there been a lot of cheese and a delicious, characteristic flavor like in France. Here, there are more than 500 types of cheeses with different flavors, mainly made from cow’s milk, sheep and goats.

Blue cheese in the famous Roquefort region with a strong aroma but easy to crush. Old Saint – Nectaire cheese made from fresh cow milk in Auvergne region. Camembert cheese has the fatty taste of milk and the aroma of fruit, covered with a layer of bread crumbs or salty bacon … Remember French, please try cheese to see cheese How easy is French being addicted to.

In France, whether enjoying the food in the luxurious restaurant or the rustic dishes, the dishonest style of the French people always keeps the polite and sophisticated. The skill is best shown when eating at a restaurant.

Kết quả hình ảnh cho Rượu nho pháp

Fatty goose liver is often processed into pâté and is present in the menu of high-class international restaurants in France. Gourmet food is called foie gras. Best of all, French people often use Foie Gras with Sauterne wine – a white wine made from grapes.

Filipino dishes are so excellent

With the diversity of rich culture, Filipino cuisine has recently received appreciation from diners everywhere.

Filipino cuisine culture is extremely diverse and rich. Not only is it attractive by taste, it is also exquisite in decoration. The Philippines has more than 7000 islands, large and small, each with a different style of cuisine, both culturally and humanly.

Mami noodles
This dish was originally from China but has now been introduced into the Philippines. But when it came to the Philippines, it was much more innovative and creative to match the appetite of the people in the Philippines. The main ingredient of this dish is the chewy noodles, then the broth is used from chicken bone and add a bit of esoteric spices. The taste of this dish will definitely appeal to you. You can enjoy this dish in any large or small restaurant in the Philippines.

Grilled Chicken Isaw
This is a very famous dish of Filipino cuisine. Chicken is processed and utilized all its parts. After being cleaned, it will be brought typical spices of the Philippines. After soaking the spices, the chicken will be taken to grill on the charcoal stove until golden brown. You will not be able to resist the attraction of this dish immediately after entering the restaurant with this dish. This dish is also used with a separate sauce that will definitely leave you with many impressive things.

Bicol Express – Filipino meat stew
You probably already know that the Philippines is a country with a predominantly non-chilli cuisine. Particularly with this dish Bicol Express is a dish with chili. This is the unique feature of this dish Bicol Express. After the material is cleaned, it will be brought to the seasoning, which obviously has chili. After spiced materials and soaked in spices will be brought to the real fruity. This dish is spicy from the taste to the broth, it will certainly be an attractive dish for all visitors who love spicy food.

Excellent foods on the streets of Philippines

If you choose Philippines as a destination for your summer, do not miss the opportunity to enjoy super-cheap, delicious street food in this hospitable country.

The street vendors are popular images of the Philippines. Here, you can find countless flavors of passion, cheap price to surprise. The joy of the trip is sometimes simply a good meal …

Orange cake like eyes made from boiled eggs dipped in flour and deep fried. Version for quail eggs called Tokneneng. This delicious fried dish is served with sweet and sour sauce or a special vinegar.

A stretched banana, wrapped in caramel brown sugar, skewered on a sharp stick is an ideal snack as well as an ideal dessert for any visitor who is visiting the Philippines street.

Isaw is also a barbecue, but Isaw has the main ingredient is clean pork or chicken organs, marinated thoroughly then skewered into bamboo sticks and grilled to perfection. Few can deny the appeal of these skewers.

Exactly, Adidas is a grilled chicken leg dish. And wherever it is, food is a favorite of many people. A bit of aromatic taste will be more perfect when it comes to spicy gravy.

The common name does not mean that the corn in the Philippines is processed normally, or at least only brings a sense of moderate taste. This is a really creative dish when corn is wrapped in a plastic cocoon and then boiled until its wonderful aroma awakens the senses. Corn seeds extracted from the core are greatly enriched with salt, margarine or cheese, giving a stimulating taste to enchantment.

Turon is indeed a sweet pleasure. A roll of eggs is covered with sugar, rolled over a hot pan to cover the brown sugar coating on the crust. This unique way of eating brings a richer taste than you think.

Kazoku Ramen

Ever since I had to say goodbye to the love of my life (i.e. gluten), I’ve had to make do with poor substitutes and laughable facsimiles. The gluten free landscape has become more bountiful as of late, but the realm of wheat-free ramen has been fairly disappointing. So, when I learned that Kazoku Ramen, a restaurant close to my new place of employment, offered gluten free noodles, I was desperate to give it a try. Edmonton has been raving about its ramen restaurants for the past year and I’d automatically assumed that my allergy would exclude me from indulging myself–thankfully, I was wrong.

Kazoku is a new restaurant located in Mayfield/Meadowlark in west Edmonton. They’ve been open since October 2015 but I hadn’t heard much about them, other than from Cindy’s review on Let’s Om Nom. Of course, moving to the west end for work gave me ample reason to browse the list of restaurants in the area–thus, my first visit to Kazoku.

The restaurant is cozy but with plenty of table space and featuring an adorable wall painting of a godzilla chewing on a piece of narutomaki. The menu is brief but well-stocked, featuring a handful of traditional Japanese appetizers (think gyoza and edamame), tempura, ramen bowls, curry, and rice bowls. The server was a little quick on the draw, asking us what we wanted less than one minute after handing us the menus, but I assume that’s because lunchtime at Kazoku brings in the hoard of regulars, each one knowing exactly what they’ll have that day. We needed a little longer to decide, finally settling on the gluten-free miso ramen with pork shoulder char siu and the Japanese char siu rice bowl. (Note: the miso ramen is the only soup that’s gluten-free. While they have gluten free noodles, the soup base for most ramen bowls includes soy. Celiacs should also note that the char siu marinade may include trace amounts of gluten, so this restaurant is much more suited to those who are gluten intolerant.) 

Miso ramen noodle bowl

For only $13, you get a huge bowl filled with delicious soup, noodles, delightfully salty meat, and all the fixings: a half soft-boiled egg, shredded nori, bamboo shoots, corn, toasted sesame, green onion, and narutomaki. Kazoku prides themselves on including fresh ingredients in all of their dishes, including hand-picked pork, free range chicken, and locally grown produce–and it shows. The flavours are amazing. My miso ramen, despite having a smaller portion of noodles than normal (thanks, gluten-free), was excellent. I couldn’t help but finish the bowl, even with the possible risk of me falling asleep at my desk afterwards.

Japanese char siu rice bowl

The restaurant does, however, close on Tuesdays–holding inconsistent weekly hours is just one of the things smaller, independent restaurants tend to do. When I showed up there on a Tuesday at lunch, it was entirely my fault for not checking the hours beforehand. That still didn’t keep me from being disappointed that I wouldn’t get an excellent bowl of ramen that day (though I have learned my lesson since then).

In any case, if you’re in the area or feel like making the trek to the west end, I recommend you swing by Kazoku, say hello to the naruto-nibbling godzilla, and sit down to a steaming bowl of delicious ramen.

Kazoku Ramen
16518 100 Avenue
Edmonton, AB T5Y 4Y2
(780) 483-0448

3.5/5

Urban China

Growing up (half) Chinese, I had my fair share of exposure to dim sum over the years. It was always a weekend brunch activity, where myself and my parents, or sometimes a huge portion of my Lee family clan, would head to our favourite dim sum restaurant and satisfy our cravings for bite-sized shrimp and pork dumplings. Siu mai was life.

And yet, never in my life did I have dim sum for dinner until February of this year. In a world where you can get a Tim Horton’s double double at any hour of the day, or go to the gym at 2:00 a.m., it can come as no surprise that dim sum, traditionally served for brunch, is now served all day at a number of restaurants. I’ve never even considered eating it past the early afternoon, but when my friend Dana suggested we grab dim sum for dinner, I was intrigued.

Enter Urban China. I’ve heard great things about their dim sum but have never managed to make it out on the weekend. An evening meal was the perfect time to try out their dumplings.

The restaurant is well taken care of, with white tablecloths, plenty of traditional decorations, and a nice, relaxing atmosphere. It’s a little classier than many of its Chinatown competitors and the price point reflects that–it’s a few dollars more per dish than restaurants like All Happy and Garden Bakery, but the food is made fresh and the service is much more attentive. While I do love the occasional greasy spoon, Urban China is about midway between the bustle and bluntness of All Happy Family Restaurant and higher-end Asian restaurants like East. It honestly just depends on your mood.

And we happened to be in the mood for dinnertime dim sum. Do you know why there are no pictures of siu mai in this post? Because we ate them much too quickly for me to even grab a photo. They’re delicious. Firm, non-greasy, and tasty–a dumpling to write home about. The har gow (which, despite having gluten, never seem to affect me) were little pieces of heaven, wrapped firmly in dough that held together steadily when picked up by chopsticks. The sticky rice was delicious, but could have contained a little more meat for my liking.

One thing about going for dim sum in the evening is that, without the constant train of carts, you select only the items that you know you like. We didn’t waste space on trying out something new; instead, we indulged in multiple orders of our favourites (two pieces of siu mai is never enough for one person).

Overall, I was impressed with the food and the service at Urban China. It’s a little pricier than my usual dim sum haunts, but I’d rather pay a few dollars more for fresh, non-greasy siu mai, since the alternative can be extremely unappetizing (i.e. pre-closure Mirama). I probably wouldn’t go there if I was starving and looking to down a million pieces of har gow, though–those beautiful little dumplings just go down way too easily.

Urban China
10604 101 St NW
Edmonton, AB T5H 2S1
(780) 758-1888

3.5/5

97 Hot Pot (Lunch)

Hot pot. I can never get enough–especially once the cold weather hits (although I’ve never been one to turn down a summer trip to Chili Hot Pot). I usually don’t branch away from my favourites but, when I heard that 97 Hot Pot offered a pared down version of hot pot for lunch, I knew I had to try it out.

One of the most glorious and gluttonous things about hot pot is that generally, you eat your fill. Each hot pot restaurant charges a set price (usually $25-$30) and you indulge in a hedonistic all-you-can-eat extravaganza. Lunch, on the other hand, doesn’t quite give you the food baby you’ve come to expect from a hot pot experience…and that’s probably a good thing.

At 97 Hot Pot, $12.95 gets you your choice of broth, five items from their menu of entrees, and a bowl of mixed vegetables. Definitely not all-you-can-eat, but not exactly Weight Watchers, either.

Sauces

My go-to soup (satay) wasn’t on the menu, so I chose the Szechuan spicy chicken, which was delicious and had the perfect amount of spice–I still like to be able to feel my tongue afterwards. For entrees, I went with the sliced sirloin beef, sliced lamb, winter melon slices, Japanese crab sticks (some of these aren’t on the full menu but they’re on the checklist you’re given), and fish balls. The mixed vegetable bowl came with broccoli, a portion of corn on the cob, squash, sui choy, bok choy, and a handful of enoki mushrooms. And, since going back, I’ve tried the handmade fish mash, which is also very good, although I’d prefer a shrimp mash if it was an option.

Szechuan spicy chicken soup

Overall? I was really impressed. You get a significant amount of food for half the price of regular hot pot and it’ll leave you feeling full and satisfied, but not uncomfortably stuffed, which is perfect if you have to go back to work afterwards (as in my case). The food items aren’t as fresh as Chili Hot Pot, but everything was still extremely tasty and the service was lightning fast. But seriously, how can you go wrong for only $13?

Sliced sirloin beef and sliced lamb

Fish balls and Japanese crab sticks

I’ve been back since and will be going again next week, so I’d say 97 Hot Pot is onto something smart by offering a lunch version. Asian Express Hot Pot is currently also offering lunch, but I haven’t seen anything yet from Urban Shabu or Chili Hot Pot (though the latter might be a little too out of the way for a lunchtime excursion). In any case, I’d recommend this restaurant if you want a quick, tasty hot pot lunch but would defer you to Chili Hot Pot if you want to invest more time in an evening hot pot experience.

97 Hot Pot
10602 92 Street
Edmonton, AB
(587) 521-1888

4/5

Volcano Restaurant

Volcano is in a great location for those living south of Whyte Avenue–easily accessible by Calgary Trail and Gateway Boulevard, the restaurant offers both Japanese and Vietnamese cuisine in a well-decorated, spacious building. The combination of Asian flavour offerings is unusual but not unheard-of in our city, where one can get Korean short ribs at many Japanese restaurants, or enjoy a Pad Thai served up alongside a Curry Laksa.

When we arrived at the event, we were greeted with a glass of prosecco and given a chance to grab a seat at one of the many tables. The food samplings were laid out in platters: sushi, sashimi, and maki on one side of the table, short ribs, spring rolls, and pork chops on the other. The divide was interesting but not unwelcome–it’s nice to be able to pair cool raw fish with a cooked item or two.

I took a little bit of everything, grabbed a sake caesar, and sat down with my plate of goodies. Everything was good, although the short ribs will always come up tops for me. The tuna sashimi was light and fluffy, as it should be, and the unagi maki was filled with flavour.

We were lucky enough to witness the ribbon cutting ceremony, introduced by Ingrid Schifer de Dennis from Schif and the City and followed by a brief speech from the owner of Volcano. The event also had a photo booth set up by Mojo Photo, which was a great way to document the occasion (other than the usual flurry of tweets and food photos, of course).

I haven’t had a chance to try the full menu yet, but I’d rate Volcano as a tasty, reliable Japanese/Vietnamese restaurant based on my experience at the grand opening. I don’t feel like I can give it a fair rating until I dine there on a regular night, so my apologies for not including the usual wine glass ratings at the end of this post.

The prices are in the mid- to high-range for a sushi restaurant, so I’d estimate prices to be around $40-50 per person for sushi (depending on how much you can eat) and around $15-20 per person for Vietnamese. They also offer a variety of Western and Chinese dishes, including brunch omelettes and chicken stir fry. The menu on the website doesn’t appear to be working at the moment, but you can view their full offering on SkipTheDishes.ca.

Volcano Edmonton
4226 Gateway Blvd.
Edmonton, AB T6K 7J1
(780) 756-2218

SUSHI TRAIN

As my coworker so eloquently put it, “Chew chew! Climb aboard the Sushi Train!”

Edmonton’s newest rotation sushi bar restaurant, Sushi Train, opened its doors on July 12th in a modest location by MacEwan University on 104 Street. The premise is simple: the chef makes a variety of different kinds of sushi and places them on a conveyor belt using different coloured plates. The plates reflect the price (blue = $3.50; red = $4.50; green = $5.50; black = $6.50) and each one is placed within a time slot on the conveyor belt so that you can tell how fresh everything is–for example, if you arrived at 12:30pm, a dish situated behind the 10-20 marker will have been made between 12:10pm and 12:20pm.

It’s a unique concept for Edmonton, but kaiten-zushi (conveyor belt sushi) is a pretty standard style of restaurant in Japan. Edmonton has seen train-style sushi restaurants before (Sakura in WEM), but they don’t seem to last. Due to the nature of how they serve food, kaiten-zushi requires a steady stream of customers during opening hours to avoid waste–too few customers, and food will have to be tossed. Too many, and the chef/kitchen will be overwhelmed.

It’s a delicate balance, much like the one between fish and rice on a perfectly made piece of sushi.

Luckily, MacEwan is home to a number of hungry students, including sushi fanatics, so Sushi Train certainly has a chance.

There aren’t many seats, since most are placed around the rotating bar, but luckily it wasn’t that busy when we arrived for lunch. It’s a really fun experience waiting to see what the chef will place on the belt next and there’s the nail-biting few minutes when you see something you want that’s just out of reach. Will it come around again? Will someone snap it up before it makes it to you?

As for taste, I was satisfied. The sushi was fresh (as we could see) and there were a number of options to choose from. Octopus balls, red snapper, crispy California rolls, gyoza, and much more. The quality isn’t quite the same as Kyoto or Mikado, but it’s still very good. A solid choice for sushi, in my opinion.

Price-wise, I could see a meal at Sushi Train getting very expensive, very quickly. For lunch, I tried five different dishes (2-4 pieces per plate, depending on what I ordered) and my total came to about $23, with no drinks other than water and green tea. A whole dinner at Sushi Train could easily get up to $50 per person, so be wary of those plates.

All in all, I’d definitely recommend this place, especially if you’ve never tried a kaiten-zushi before. The crispy California rolls are worth a visit alone!

Sushi Train
10725 104 Ave NW
Edmonton, Alberta
(587) 521-7788 

 3.5/5

Taste of Edmonton 2014

Ten days of Taste of Edmonton is never enough.

This year, the festival amped up their Sip ‘n Savour tent, offering cooking workshops, local flavours, pop-up events, and even a children’s tasting and exploration session. As always, there were plenty of restaurant pavilions to choose from, each one offering two of their speciality treats.

Prices were reasonable this year–most items were only three tickets. At $1.25 a ticket, that’s only $3.75 a dish. I remember spending quite a bit more last year, so this was a welcome change.

I didn’t get the chance to do a full round of the festival, but what I did try was great. Here’s an overview of each dish I sampled and where you can find them.

Beef Short Ribs and Mash
Normand’s Bistro

As my first dish of the day, Normand’s knocked it out of the park. The tenderest boneless short rib peeled away with the touch of a plastic fork, complemented by a beautiful gravy and creamy mashed potatoes. There’s not much I can tell you about beef short ribs, which I’m sure you’ve eaten before–these ones, in particular, were simply an excellent version of the same.

Injera and Doro Wot (Chicken Breast) and Ater Kik Aletcha Wot
Langano Skies Ethiopian Restaurant

Doro wot with chicken breast was similar to a spicy, thick stew and, served with injera, was a beautiful kick to the senses. While not quite searingly hot, this dish had enough of a kick to merit the ater kik aletcha wot, a pureed split pea dish (similar to lentils). Eaten together, the split peas offered a cooling sensation that made the heat of the first dish much more bearable. Luckily, I love heat, so I could’ve eaten a big ol’ bowl of that doro wot. Yum.

Grilled Quail with Pomegranate Sauce
Hoang Long Casual Fare

This was definitely the winner of the day. Hoang Long grilled whole quails (which takes 15 minutes per quail) and served them with a pomegranate sauce that had just a hint of sweetness. Tender, perfectly cooked, and absolutely delicious, this dish caused people all around to take a seat and bask in the delicate flavours of this tiny bird. It was messy and a little awkward to eat, but completely and utterly worth it. If the whole point of Taste of Edmonton is to convince diners to visit their restaurants, then Hoang Long has me sold.

Bison Slider with Gorgonzola Blue Cheese
The Underground Tap and Grill

I’m not generally a slider kind of person. I’d much rather eat a big burger or something else. With that in mind, this bison slider with gorgonzola was pretty good, but not something that I’d normally spend my money on. I admit that the blue cheese was a nice touch–I’m a sucker for a nice blue cheese. Nothing about this dish particularly amazed me, but it was solid pub food. I can appreciate that.

BBQ Pork Spring Rolls
Hong Kong Bakery

I didn’t actually try these, but you can take Funmi‘s word for it that they were very good. Just enough meat without being overly greasy, apparently. I liked how Hong Kong Bakery kept it simple and classic: what could be more Chinese than spring rolls and green onion cakes?

HONG HUONG VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

It’s a weekend morning. Or afternoon. You’re not quite sure because the pounding behind your eyeballs is making it difficult to focus on your cell phone. You’re feeling a bit rough (but who wouldn’t after all those shots of Belvedere and your stint as queen of Flip Cup?) and you know–you just know–you need to eat some pho.

It seems as if pho is rapidly overtaking dim sum as the most popular brunchy Asian food and, luckily for Edmontonians, there’s no shortage of places to park your butt and eat some noodle soup.

We recently decided to give Hong Huong Vietnamese Restaurant, a small place on the outskirts of Clareview, a try. To be concise, it was pretty good. It didn’t blow me away, but I did have a good, solid meal.

One of the things that I really liked about this restaurant was the amount of natural light streaming in through the restaurants windows, which covered most of the building’s facade. It makes the restaurant seem more friendly, while also setting the scene for some great food photography.

Our table may have been sticky, but the service was decent. They were reasonably fast with our orders: a 6-colour bowl for Taner and soup with rare beef, flank, and brisket for me. The bun bowl exploded with meats: pork, beef, chicken, shrimp, and meatballs, all accompanied with the usual spring rolls. The pho was less colourful but just as tasty. I generally prefer a darker, full-bodied soup for my pho (as I like my wine)–Hong Huong’s soup was much lighter but was full of flavour. The rare beef had unfortunately already cooked to well done by the time it got to my table, but I ate it with relish regardless.

The vietnamese coffee was much too sweet for either of us to drink, so that was left mostly untouched. Everything else, though, was great. We were happy with the food, content with the service, and pleased with our overall experience. As with most Vietnamese restaurants, the prices are extremely reasonable. For two meals and a coffee, our bill came under $30. Bargain!

If you live in the south or west end of the city, you probably won’t need to make the trek to Clareview for a great bowl of pho. If you’re a northsider, though, give it a shot. It’s about time that you tried something other than Namao Centre’s Pho Hoan Pasteur or 97 Street’s Pho Song Huong.

Hong Huong Vietnamese Restaurant
14425 Miller Boulevard NW
Edmonton, AB T5Y 0L4
(780) 476-3024
Sun-Thurs: 11am-9pm
Fri-Sat: 10am-9pm 

 3.5/5